Superbike Coach tested Rabaconda tire changer

DIY Motorcycle Tire Changer by Rabaconda

We at Superbike-Coach have lots of motorcycle tires to swap. We have all kinds of school bikes- Supermoto, Superbikes, Touring and Adventure bikes, mini and race bikes. Rabaconda provided a prototype of their street bike tire changer so we could try out ourselves. Coach Can Akkaya and Dean Lonskey unboxed, installed and changed a tire pretty much in real time in this video. The Rabaconda tire changer will save a lot of money and waiting time getting tires swapped. It will pay off quick, so check it out.

rabaconda superbikecoachThe unit came from Estonia in Europe very quick, with way less weight and size as we use to know about DIY tire changers. Since Rabaconda send us the prototype (patent is undergoing), they couldn’t include any install instructions because they were not done by the time. So Dean and Coach took it as an additional challenge and had lots of fun with it.

Enjoy the video and see how easy it can be.

Superbike-Coach Corp

 

 

Understanding The Learning Curve

I know and understand you have expectations, but it’s you who has to understand something here. Learning is not always a steep and straight line up. That’s not impossible, but I can tell you that this doesn’t happen a lot. Then there are others whom learning curve goes in waves slowly going up. With those, it’s what granny use to say: “Sometimes you make a step backwards to finally make two forward”. But for the most track riders and racers- their learning curve is going to hit a plateau, and they stuck there for a long time if they don’t grasp this here…

As for now, you are like this… you are confused. You don’t understand why you hit plateau because you’ve learned so much. You’ve read all those f’n books, watched videos, and you might even been through some good schooling. You’re questioning what you’ve learned is right. Nothing feels right actually, and the harder you try- the worse it seems to get. You are deeply frustrated and the first thoughts of quitting popping up. Eventually not, because you could keep that away by finding some excuses. What?!… you feel offended by honesty? Why don’t you ask me how I know this shit?! I’ve been there too.

Besides that knowledge and try-and-error creates your learning curve- you pretty much have no influence of it’s waves. Those depend on other things, like you, your character, situations happening and/or how many times you’ve crashed. You’ll also learn from crashing- the bad things, but it’ll cost you making a step backwards first. See what I’m saying? Let me give you some examples.

the learning curveLook at the picture above. That’s a section on Nuerburgring Nordschleife in Germany, which was my home track by the way. Let’s say I would teach you that you could fly through this section at a 147 miles an hour on a particular line and also told you what the absolute latest braking marker would be. That teaching would be 100% right on the money… but would you be able to pull this off from the go get?… No, you more likely would get hurt on that try. That track is 12 miles long and has 154 turns. I could teach you on the dime exact where to brake and every inch of the line, but YOU are the one who has to explore what their potential is. That’s on YOU!

Let’s say I’d lead you on and off for 10 laps. Your lap times would go up and down, but in the end with an up tendency, correct? That is good this way, because if you would have the mental strength and riding abilities which allow you to go at the possible maximum- you’d die, just because you can’t memories 154 mostly blind turns within 10 laps!

Knowledge is an elevated resource- taking advantage of the potential of a newly exposed recourse takes time. The dangerous part of this is, that if you don’t SEE THIS at a time when you hit that plateau. You will get hurt mentally and eventually physically if you have a strong competitive nature. Frustration takes over and you’ll questioning what you’ve learned is even right. Wanna read the Nordschleife example ones more to get what I am saying?!

Let me give you another, maybe a more feel-able example. Let’s say you use to be riding on shitty tires, but now we put you some of the finest tires on your bike- MotoGP race tires which you can even buy even if you’d have the money for them. Now you’re going out again and you eventually make a little progress- but it is extremely unlikely that you are capable of riding them at their fullest possible potential. They deliver you a recourse you’ll have to explore on your own. That MotoGP tire engineer can tell you how they have to be ridden, so information is 100% right but the exploration depends on you and your capabilities.

If you allow impatience and/or frustration to get in-between, you will only extend your ‘plateau time’ in your learning curve. Important by then is this: honesty, trust, smartness, relaxation, reset. Truth is a sharp knife, but it cuts best!

Headcoach Can Akkaya, Superbike-Coach Corp

Being a talented motorcycle rider

I hate the word ‘talent’. Nobody is born with a ‘racing DNA’. Just because your dad rode bikes or even raced, doesn’t mean ‘you got it’. They might be able to teach you though, but that’s not what I want to throw a light on. Let’s take a deeper look what that word might does to you.

You see a rider or watch MotoGP racing and go… man, this guy is talented! But you, personally, don’t see such mystical medical phenomena running through your vanes. You are not even confident enough to lie to yourself that you are some kinda ‘talented’. And here ya go… your road block is set, because you don’t believe you don’t have talent- you’re not even trying to get there. You might think this all came naturally to those who are ‘talented’.

To be honest, you didn’t just extended learning curve- you also put a crack into your own confidence. Oh, and you also just took the credit of all those racers who dedicated their life to become what and where they are. They gave their blood, sweat and bones to ‘learn’ everything which you might see as naturally gifted. That’s not right, cuz’ some even have died to get there. Nothing good comes for free, naturally, or in a nice gift box in this sport. Nothing. Everything you see is learnable, so don’t ‘hide’ behind a fancy, lazy, and mystically glowing word.

Though, there is something in one or the other. Those who have a good eye-hand coordination. Those who have a good feel for distance and speed. A person with ‘this’ is probably good with any other sports too. If you have ‘this’, then you might pick things up quick. If you don’t… don’t worry. Just don’t hide behind the word, stand up and say ‘I can get there too no matter how long it’ll take’. It just needs self-honesty and allowances to have a less steep learning curve. If you can arrange that with yourself, then you are on a more health path actually. Let’s see why.

Superbike-Coach level chartNow let’s say have a good eye-hand-coordination. Everything seems to get to you easier and quicker. Being a quick learner sounds incredibly positive, doesn’t it? But is it really?! Let me tell you why not with this time line. The red line reflects all the physical skills you’ve learned, so braking steering, shifting etc. The better your eye-hand-coordination, feel for distance and speed, and also depending on your size of balls- that line goes up quickly. Too quick for the most, because with all the physical skill set you’ll become TOO EARLY TOO FAST!

By then, your eyes and brain are not trained yet- not ready yet. Your instinct hasn’t developed yet. That blue line right there takes up way more time to create. This line feeds on all the stuff during your time as a rider or racer. Feeling the front tire limit the first time in your life is quite an experience. The difference of a good/bad line. A stressed out bike at maximum braking power and so on and so on. All this creates muscle memory. Feels, sounds, smalls, time, distance, sight, memory. It’s what granny use to say… you’ll learn more from loosing than from winning, and she’s damn right!

So why are you trying so hard to learn all those physical skills so fast?! Rome hasn’t build in one f’n day. Take your time, because if those two lines through your time isn’t in a health balance… you’re screwed. It begins to work against you. Go, ask me how I know…

Headcoach Can Akkaya, Superbike-Coach Corp

BikeMaster Tools

Every garage needs tools to function, and if you have one or want to start out getting into wrenching yourself, then i might have the right supplier for you.

bikemaster producat with Superbike-Coach Tools and shop supplies are expensive. What you need is a plan to overlook what you want to maintain or repair. Sky is the limit. Yes you spend on tools, but you’ll figure soon how quick it all paid off, as long as you look into BikeMaster Products.

So, do you want to maintain things around your bike? Like servicing your chain- swapping oil or tires and brake pads? That will only take a few standard tools and saves you loads of money already.

Over time you’ll get more confident and start replacing things, like broken fairings, levers, and service brake fluid and such. That will take also some more specific tools, especially when you go into repairing engines yourself. I can tell ya… that saves you fortunes, being able to do stuff like that.

Superbikecoach uses bikemaster toolsOnes you are through this, you are also not far away from crafting things, like building brackets etc. Fixing things the ‘MacGyver’ way. Also here, BikeMaster can help you with in the most possible affordable way.

Especially when you are into track riding or racing, you’ll have to do things on your own. Measuring tools, bearing replacement kits, and tools which make work easier and quicker.

Go check BikeMaster out and start doing some stuff on your own. It’s fun and makes you positively more busy with your hobby.

Headcoach Can Akkaya, Superbike-Coach Corp

Can Akkaya with HRC technician in Zolder Circuit, Belgium 1993

How to become a professional motorcycle racer

If I would get a dollar, each time someone asks me on how to become a professional racer…

I am a strong believer in dreams, because all good things BEGIN WITH A DREAM, but becoming a professional racer is something only a few can turn into reality. I was one, and now I’m a professional coach- which is why I know. An easy way to look at it is: You gotta be THAT GOOD at it, that you get paid for it.

Just this explains a lot and makes dreams pop like soap bubbles already, right?! Especially when you just started racing and look out to those stars already by asking that question too early. Cuz’ how do you know that you’ll ever be THAT GOOD at it?! If you look for it too early, you just make yourselves a four years old who says ‘I wanna be an astronaut when I’m grown up’. Not saying it’s impossible- but it kinda skips quite some significant steps there. Btw… nova days you kinda have to be on the race bike at an age of 4 years already to eventually make pro level. If you are not, then I suggest to make sure to graduate school so that you have a plan B. Sorry for brutal honesty.

Let’s clean something up before we go deeper into this. I noticed that some claiming the title ‘professional’ because their fast- or someone calls an instructor at a track day a ‘professional’ while they are not actually. It seems this term has become a indicator for skill level, like: Amateur> Advanced> Professional. So like a replacement for Expert kinda thing. In fact- they are not professionals, unless they can make a living of it so that they don’t have to follow any other regular full or part time jobs anymore. That’s a professional.

To become one of those few comes with broken bones, blood, dedication, discipline, soul, live changing decisions, sweat, fitness, age, management skills, organization, relationships, and a drop dead killer instinct. There is way more going into this. Things which are off bike and track. You are doing things according to create or to maintain your ‘market value’. At this point… OMG, just overthinking all the facets is almost impossible to bring this together here. But let me try…

Being a professional racer is a 24/7, 365 days a year job. You have ‘vacation’ during the time your bones are healing and skin slowing closes wounds. I did 30 kilometers per day on a mountain-bike. Your daily nutrition is carefully picked (in other words, also your family etc has to play along with your racer life cycle!). Between scheduled testing new parts, you travel a lot from track to track or to the team quarters. You have an appointment for a TV show or a radio podcast interview to do. Magazines or newspapers calling for interviews. You’re sending pictures and autograph cards to fans. You organize team travel and dates for an entire calendar year. Just think of the time and money that point consumes. One of your local sponsors has an event and wants you to pick up your new mountain-bike, which he gives you for that. You shake lots of hands and smile into cameras even if you don’t feel like it. You have lots of dinners with team owners who want you to race for them. You have to evaluate a lot and make the right career decisions. In-between you do Moto Cross and whatnot, just to kick and haulin ass. You have dinners with sponsors or those who hopefully become one.

This is just a fraction of the ‘pro package’, and if you call someone a professional while they are not… then you literally slap those few in the face and take their credit away from being a real professional, because they are THAT GOOD at it- on and off the race bike.

Though…

Remember Michael ‘Eddie the Eagle’ Edwards? He never was that good at Ski Jumping actually, but his ‘Never Surrender’ attitude, the shortest jumps in Olympics ever, and his cricket way to jump got him into the hearts of the crowd. ‘Eddie’ had more publicity than the actual competition winner and got TV, radio and the press. That is marketing value, and so he got into lots of lucrative sponsorships. Proof that anyone can make it. Go get creative if you aren’t THAT GOOD at it :-)

Getting hired?

Most likely you won’t, unless you are already THAT GOOD at it. If so, than this is either the so called ‘Works team‘ (for example: Yamaha Factory Racing, HRC Honda Racing Corporation, etc)- a ‘Satellite Racing Team‘ (like: LCR, Tech3, etc). By then though, you are professional for a while already.

You’ll most likely run this just like a business. You won’t EVER get a million dollar RedBull contract of the batch. It takes time to find the right relationships. They start to trust you and discounts turn into free of charge products. If you really getting that much better, you’ll be able to have no more costs in regard bike and gear.

As your calendar fills up and you got tons better, you could turn product sponsorship contracts to monetary support a little, From here it might be enough to have a regular part time job now, and boom- you’d be a Semi-Pro. At this point you’ll pay taxes for this and your life has been immensely changed by then.

All of a sudden there is this championship winning team who just lost their number one racer due to injuries. They call you because they know that you are about to be THAT GOOD at it, and you go contact the relationships you’ve built and tell them about this opportunity. An opportunity which attracts press, fans, other teams… and the circle is closing! You are about to be a professional racer, who gets paid because he’s THAT GOOD at it.

How much can you make?

A pro racer is a promoting machine which has a market value. That value depends on many things: Character, personality, skill, fan base, intelligence, press attractive and much more- all that grows into your racing skill/appearance. Look, if you don’t have the personality to close a sponsor contract with a bunch of zero’s, then you walk away with 2 sets of tires, right?! Your race personality plays into that. Some have more fans crashing all the time just because their ‘bad ass’. Make sense?

There was a German world champion in the 90’s ones. While he barley collected $300k for his next MotoGP season, some upcoming Italian got $7 million for finishing the season 5th. Honda Racing saw more in this guy, and to be able to promote the brand. If you look like you’d ‘race for free’ and the umbrella girl next to you steals the show, then you know. You’re not walking through the paddock, low on confidence and in healthy flip flops- but expect to be seen by fans, press and sponsors. There has to be an aura, attitude, personality, race intelligence.

So there is no exact amount. It’s pretty much what you can make of it. Sky can be the limit, and that could be product sponsorships, monetary sponsorships, licensing, TV rights/share, Merchandising. season bonuses, cash for wins/results, or/and top league… a permanent pay check from a team.

What now?

I know. It sounds like that you’d have to be born with all this to become a professional. Trust me, all this is learnable and you grow into it. Let’s not destroy dreams… let’s have many. Now here is what I want you to do as an amateur racer…

You go race the living dead out of it. You develop a racing intelligence. Have an attitude and show personality god damn it. Be the one to beat and make others feel this. Create little relationships with sponsors. Ask for discounts, then for this or that product for free- and when time comes and competition level grows, you ask for money. Run your own team and learn things around it. Look good- just like you could promote something. Then you might become THAT GOOD at it that some team calls you up and ask you to race for them- OR you find sponsors so you can buy yourself into a team (they hand-pick!) which has man and equipment power to win international championships.

Then… you might don’t need to do a regular job anymore. BUT make sure you play and race real well, because pro athletes have an expiration date. Pro racers are like comets… they are glowing bright for a short moment in time only.

Headcoach Can Akkaya, Superbike-Coach Corp