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can akkaya headcoach perfection

Addicted to Perfection

As usual, I want to describe scenes from professional racing. That doesn’t mean this is about racing and doesn’t apply to you, so go grab a beer and listen closely, cuz’ you get something for free from a professional…

can akkaya about routineFor the most professional racers I know, and that included myself- EVERYTHING needs to be 100% in order. In the right place, at the right time, and in a complete routine. Only THEN it can channel positive energy to make the moment count and also to be ‘perfect’. The moment when your team leaves the starting grid and you are on your own. This routine literally restarts after a race- winding back/up for the next one. It doesn’t feel this way, but it’s there. While the racer goes for some Supermoto and lots of mountain biking… he already dials towards that moment of perfection next Sunday. He’s talking to his friends and laughs. It doesn’t feel like it, but it’s there. It has begun already. The bike gets prepared down to look at each bolt. The office works to organize travels for each member. The team arrives in the paddock and sets everything up. There is fun- lots of fun so that it doesn’t feel like it… but it’s there. Practice sessions- qualifying sessions and warm up… it surly feels different all the time, but all and everyone is following routines. A routine that chases perfection. Now you’re standing on your starting grid again. Warm up sign comes up and the pace car leaves, and so your team members. You are on your own and all you think- all you feel is “…everything is perfect. I am ready!”.

The finish flag falls and you are relieved for a couple of hours before it all restarts… the strive for perfection- for that particular moment.

It’s almost like a solid OCD isn’t it? But do you see what I am pointing out here? It all channels to ‘a perfect moment’. Nothing is perfect forever ones you or someone else decides to have ‘reached perfection’. But that’s something most of you are chasing… to be perfect forever. Nothing is perfect forever. There is always something better you could do or have done. There is always the next bike you want to have- the ice cream you eat- the helmet you wear. I could go on forever one this because this one goes in all live directions.

Let me tell you something which philosophy I decided to follow. Perfection is an illusion! Don’t ever decide to have reached perfection- cuz’ where to go when you’re there? Unless you have the urge of a professional racer to chase and to channel positive energy up to THAT MOMENT, which allows you to snap into the competitor you HAVE TO BE… for you my friends, I hope you never reach perfection.

Because the moment you think you did- that moment is dangerous because you stop searching, you stop striving. Your journey is over. Just make sure you keep that strive in a healthy balance with ‘fun’, because too much of chasing and the feel to never be ‘like that guy’ (or whatever you categorize to be perfect) can lead you right into dark rooms. I’ve been there, which is why I know. A room enriched with frustration, confidence breaking energies and not knowing where the f’n door is out of the darkness.

So don’t chase perfection, cuz’ you never reach it anyway. It’s a dilemma. Instead- enjoy your imperfections. Learn to laugh about yourself, because perfection means pressure! :-)

Headcoach Can Akkaya, Superbike-Coach Corp

Bikemaster chain superbikecoach

Two More Teeth

Bikemaster chain superbikecoachYou guys remember my article ‘Motorcycle Sprocket Job: More Power‘? That’s where this one extends it a little.

So finally time has come that I can also ramp up the game on our Ducati Multistrada 1200 Enduro Pro. When it’s time for a new chain- that’s also a good time to make these upgrades, and so I took advantage of it.

“Indy” is going to get 2 more teeth on the rear. Does this bike really need more torque?… oh hell no, but pure acceleration and even better ride-ability can’t hurt. The gears were a touch too far apart in my opinion, so that bigger rear sprocket gets them closer together and that gives me more options in regard gear choice on corners. BikeMaster had all the stuff I needed to get the job done, and quick as usual and their pricing is right!

First you want to loose up all sprocket bolts, before you get the rear wheel out. That makes things easier. Now the wheel comes out and the new BikeMaster sprocket replaces that extremely cheep looking Ducati OEM part. I mean… look at it!

Bikemaster chain superbikecoachNext step is the chain. For that reason you put the wheel back in and cut the old chain. Don’t pull it out though, because you want to connect the new chain to it and to pull it through the swing arm and over and out of the front sprocket housing. That way you can save all the work with it. Now put the wheel/axle in the mid range of your chain spanners, which gives you wiggle room for your chain adjustments later. Ones done, you lay the chain up the sprocket to determine the length and so where to take links out. I recommend to look twice which and where you take it out. Now you close the chain with a lock (comes with the chain) and adjust its slack. Don’t forget to tighten up your rear axle… and you are all done.

You can’t add power and torque in a cheaper way. Do yourself a favor and do it. Thank me later :)

Headcoach Can Akkaya, Superbike-Coach Corp

There is ‘that one bolt’

There is ‘that one bolt’ which extends a simple job in regard time, dirt, and resources… ONE fuckin’ bolt. You know those?!

So I did a brake job on my Multistrada Enduro Pro, because ‘Indy’ was missing braking power, which is already restricted with those knobbie tires. The plan: New brake fluid and bleeding air- new pads and cleaning caliper pistons- and 2 new rotors.

While everything else went well, the rotor bolts are glued in the wheel as shit, and I knew that was coming. Some manufacturers also make it harder by using bolts you’d need Torx tools for. I have, but those are really fragile. One after another coming off, not without a fight though… a bleeding finger and a trip to the hardware store for a new set of Torx tools is what that took. Then there is that one bolt. Out by a quarter and a destroyed head.

“MacGyver mode” is on now, as well as a never surrender mind set. Not enough meat to grab it with clamp pliers. Not enough out to saw its dead head off. Figuring that those cheap bolt removal tools you can buy with those TV commercials are senseless. Drilling the head was next, but the next half size bigger hexa did the job after hammering it in as much as possible. Then turning it as straight and smooth as possible got it finally out.

Four f’n hours and a garage floor covered with dirt, tools, sweat and blood for that one bolt :-)

Coach Tip: Heating up glued in bolts helps too.

Headcoach Can Akkaya, Superbike-Coach Corp

COVID-19 and how Superbike-Coach deals with it

I wished I’d have a solution for all of us. Especially I feel for those families who went- or are about to go through the worse with this Corona virus. So I hope YOU- our students and fans, that everything is fine with you so far.

Personally, I am tired of hearing it… wash your hands and keep 6ft distance. It seems though that some are not getting it and calling up for group ride outs and meet ups on social media. That attitude is to find also with churches etc. I mean… a line around shopping centers for toilet paper is a great way to keep spreading. So my conclusion is that they more likely to risk to catch the virus standing in line- than inability to wipe ass… Is that about right?! Simple risk math: How many shits does it take before heading out to ICU?!

I am worried that stupidity keeps the virus coming in waves as we’re waiting for the vaccine, which is the only way to get to the lives we’ve all had before COVID-19. Stupidity will extend the pain and loss, but that’s not all. This ignorance is extremely disrespectful to all those who try to do the right thing, and to all businesses who HAVE to shot down. Don’t be one of them.

So, I already covered how we deal with classes affected by track lock downs. Now I want to take advantage of the ‘extra time’ I’m having and to make videos to keep helping my fellow riders. I’ll also keep writing articles, just like the new one I’ve posted. I want to encourage you to make use of your extra time and to work on your bikes and gear, and to get ready for you to ride again. That way you might get a ‘don’t look back’ attitude, and I am here to answer questions in regard upgrades… or even for some mental support.

Of course, I also want you to know that Superbike-Coach is still here and will be there for you when time is right. Please do your best to slow the spread:

  • Have your own mug when getting a coffee
  • Ride slower as usual- cuz’ you don’t want to go to ANY hospital right now!
  • Have a mask when you know there are people
  • Have gloves when filling up your fuel tank
  • Wipe off shipments
  • Buy your grocery online and pick up, or better have it delivered
  • Call mom and dad!

Hope is good… too much though might blinds you.

Headcoach Can Akkaya, Superbike-Coach Corp

Motorcycle Sprocket Job: More Power

You feel like your baby could use a little bit more punch? This article is going to help you to unlock an up to dramatic improve in regard torque character and ride-ability for about 150 bux!

That might sound like those endless advertisements which promising 10% more horsepower for a race air filter- or some shiny extra strong glowing hyper-kryptonite-supersphereographical spark plugs, and you’ll get more for a extra fee :-)

Nope, this one is totally legit and easy to do yourselves. Let’s look into the slight sketchy background first.

graphic credit: www.motorcyclespecs.co.za

All those motorcycle manufactures are selling their models mainly based on two numbers… horsepower and top speed. Yea, that’s how they get you, just admit it. While the horsepower is one thing- they are achieving those crazy top speed numbers mainly via primary ratio, gear box ratios and secondary ratios. Of course also the wheel sizes have and influence as well as the general weight and aerodynamics of your bike, but that’s something you kinda have to live with if you don’t want this to be your financial grave.

Let me just give a small overview what kind of weight this has for race teams, because racing is all about acceleration and only a fraction of time about top speed. We could set up every single gear in the transmission to match corner speed and RPM’s in a perfect torque range for turn exit performance. A “longer” (more top speed) 6th gear could gain passing chance coming out of a slipstream before late braking. The ratio was calculated on the mile exact to be fully rev’d out in 6th gear about one second before braking. Wind direction or a strategical aspect depending on- if you probably lead the race or if dog fights were predicted. All of this is a crucial part of racing. For you, we are looking at the secondary- also called the final drive. This is literally ‘outside’ the bike and can be done with regular tools and affordable parts. The influence can be surprisingly good.

So here is your scenario as the street rider or even track rider. The Germans have the Autobahn, giving their riders some top speeds we Americans on our Freeways won’t get to see ever. That might doesn’t include idiots here, but generally you are doing 70-80 miles per hour max, while your baby could do about 200 actually. That’s wasted energy if you ask me, sitting there literally never used. Another effect is, that the 1st gear is so damn long that you could do 70 with it already. The ratio makes this gear almost useless. So if we would change the final drive, it’ll also have a positive influence over the entire primary ratio for more ride-ability. Cool huh?!

The terms here are ‘longer’, for more top speed- and ‘shorter’ for more acceleration, and that’s what we want. The useful torque range will move by giving up on top speed. My Panigale 1199 is topping out at a 165. She doesn’t make 200 anymore, but the acceleration beats down the brand new V4, no kidding! So here is what I do, and that’s actually a good start out point for you as well…

I chose a specific ratio because this way, my ‘Cleopatra’ can still cruise at a 6800 rpm’s in 6th on the Freeway- while this ratio is still fair enough for the most race tracks I am going to to teach track riders. So no swapping drama here for me then. The general rule is:

Front:

  • A smaller c-sprocket = shorter (more acceleration)
  • A bigger c-sprocket = longer (more top speed)

Rear goes the opposite way:

  • A bigger sprocket = shorter (more acceleration)
  • A smaller sprocket = longer (more top speed)

Generally, I swap the sprockets this way: One tooth LESS on the front sprocket- and one tooth MORE on the rear sprocket. Rule of thumb is- one tooth more or less on the front sprocket is just like two and a half teeth on the rear. That is huge in terms of acceleration, drive-ability and responsiveness and you have no idea what you’ve been missing out here. So bare with me and get to it.

Go count front and rear sprocket teethes of your bike. Let’s say you have a 16 on the front- you go get a 15 for about $40. Now let’s say you count 45 teeth on the rear- you go get a 46 for about 80-100 bux. That small investment is the biggest ‘power upgrade’ you’ll ever get. Also no need to swap chain, because 1 down front/1 up rear needs the same chain length you already have- unless you also want to convert from your huge OEM chain to a 520 chain kit (I covered that in ‘Coach’s Motorcycle Bible‘)

Most of the needed parts are easy to get to at BikeMaster. They come affordable and fast. They also have chains if needed. if you want to go a slight different route with your sprocket choice, I’d suggest to see the ratio/speed differences ones you know the numbers of teeth your bike originally has, and compare it with the numbers you plan to go with here. If you are not sure about something- just drop a comment and I’ll see if I can help.

Please note though… if you make any changes in this regard- make sure all bolts are tight and take it easy riding it. Give it time to re-feel the new character of your bike. I’m not responsible for you bullshitting around, you hear me?! :-)

Headcoach Can Akkaya, Superbike-Coach Corp