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COVID-19 and how Superbike-Coach deals with it

I wished I’d have a solution for all of us. Especially I feel for those families who went- or are about to go through the worse with this Corona virus. So I hope YOU- our students and fans, that everything is fine with you so far.

Personally, I am tired of hearing it… wash your hands and keep 6ft distance. It seems though that some are not getting it and calling up for group ride outs and meet ups on social media. That attitude is to find also with churches etc. I mean… a line around shopping centers for toilet paper is a great way to keep spreading. So my conclusion is that they more likely to risk to catch the virus standing in line- than inability to wipe ass… Is that about right?! Simple risk math: How many shits does it take before heading out to ICU?!

I am worried that stupidity keeps the virus coming in waves as we’re waiting for the vaccine, which is the only way to get to the lives we’ve all had before COVID-19. Stupidity will extend the pain and loss, but that’s not all. This ignorance is extremely disrespectful to all those who try to do the right thing, and to all businesses who HAVE to shot down. Don’t be one of them.

So, I already covered how we deal with classes affected by track lock downs. Now I want to take advantage of the ‘extra time’ I’m having and to make videos to keep helping my fellow riders. I’ll also keep writing articles, just like the new one I’ve posted. I want to encourage you to make use of your extra time and to work on your bikes and gear, and to get ready for you to ride again. That way you might get a ‘don’t look back’ attitude, and I am here to answer questions in regard upgrades… or even for some mental support.

Of course, I also want you to know that Superbike-Coach is still here and will be there for you when time is right. Please do your best to slow the spread:

  • Have your own mug when getting a coffee
  • Ride slower as usual- cuz’ you don’t want to go to ANY hospital right now!
  • Have a mask when you know there are people
  • Have gloves when filling up your fuel tank
  • Wipe off shipments
  • Buy your grocery online and pick up, or better have it delivered
  • Call mom and dad!

Hope is good… too much though might blinds you.

Headcoach Can Akkaya, Superbike-Coach Corp

Motorcycle Sprocket Job: More Power

You feel like your baby could use a little bit more punch? This article is going to help you to unlock an up to dramatic improve in regard torque character and ride-ability for about 150 bux!

That might sound like those endless advertisements which promising 10% more horsepower for a race air filter- or some shiny extra strong glowing hyper-kryptonite-supersphereographical spark plugs, and you’ll get more for a extra fee :-)

Nope, this one is totally legit and easy to do yourselves. Let’s look into the slight sketchy background first.

graphic credit: www.motorcyclespecs.co.za

All those motorcycle manufactures are selling their models mainly based on two numbers… horsepower and top speed. Yea, that’s how they get you, just admit it. While the horsepower is one thing- they are achieving those crazy top speed numbers mainly via primary ratio, gear box ratios and secondary ratios. Of course also the wheel sizes have and influence as well as the general weight and aerodynamics of your bike, but that’s something you kinda have to live with if you don’t want this to be your financial grave.

Let me just give a small overview what kind of weight this has for race teams, because racing is all about acceleration and only a fraction of time about top speed. We could set up every single gear in the transmission to match corner speed and RPM’s in a perfect torque range for turn exit performance. A “longer” (more top speed) 6th gear could gain passing chance coming out of a slipstream before late braking. The ratio was calculated on the mile exact to be fully rev’d out in 6th gear about one second before braking. Wind direction or a strategical aspect depending on- if you probably lead the race or if dog fights were predicted. All of this is a crucial part of racing. For you, we are looking at the secondary- also called the final drive. This is literally ‘outside’ the bike and can be done with regular tools and affordable parts. The influence can be surprisingly good.

So here is your scenario as the street rider or even track rider. The Germans have the Autobahn, giving their riders some top speeds we Americans on our Freeways won’t get to see ever. That might doesn’t include idiots here, but generally you are doing 70-80 miles per hour max, while your baby could do about 200 actually. That’s wasted energy if you ask me, sitting there literally never used. Another effect is, that the 1st gear is so damn long that you could do 70 with it already. The ratio makes this gear almost useless. So if we would change the final drive, it’ll also have a positive influence over the entire primary ratio for more ride-ability. Cool huh?!

The terms here are ‘longer’, for more top speed- and ‘shorter’ for more acceleration, and that’s what we want. The useful torque range will move by giving up on top speed. My Panigale 1199 is topping out at a 165. She doesn’t make 200 anymore, but the acceleration beats down the brand new V4, no kidding! So here is what I do, and that’s actually a good start out point for you as well…

I chose a specific ratio because this way, my ‘Cleopatra’ can still cruise at a 6800 rpm’s in 6th on the Freeway- while this ratio is still fair enough for the most race tracks I am going to to teach track riders. So no swapping drama here for me then. The general rule is:

Front:

  • A smaller c-sprocket = shorter (more acceleration)
  • A bigger c-sprocket = longer (more top speed)

Rear goes the opposite way:

  • A bigger sprocket = shorter (more acceleration)
  • A smaller sprocket = longer (more top speed)

Generally, I swap the sprockets this way: One tooth LESS on the front sprocket- and one tooth MORE on the rear sprocket. Rule of thumb is- one tooth more or less on the front sprocket is just like two and a half teeth on the rear. That is huge in terms of acceleration, drive-ability and responsiveness and you have no idea what you’ve been missing out here. So bare with me and get to it.

Go count front and rear sprocket teethes of your bike. Let’s say you have a 16 on the front- you go get a 15 for about $40. Now let’s say you count 45 teeth on the rear- you go get a 46 for about 80-100 bux. That small investment is the biggest ‘power upgrade’ you’ll ever get. Also no need to swap chain, because 1 down front/1 up rear needs the same chain length you already have- unless you also want to convert from your huge OEM chain to a 520 chain kit (I covered that in ‘Coach’s Motorcycle Bible‘)

Most of the needed parts are easy to get to at BikeMaster. They come affordable and fast. They also have chains if needed. if you want to go a slight different route with your sprocket choice, I’d suggest to see the ratio/speed differences ones you know the numbers of teeth your bike originally has, and compare it with the numbers you plan to go with here. If you are not sure about something- just drop a comment and I’ll see if I can help.

Please note though… if you make any changes in this regard- make sure all bolts are tight and take it easy riding it. Give it time to re-feel the new character of your bike. I’m not responsible for you bullshitting around, you hear me?! :-)

Headcoach Can Akkaya, Superbike-Coach Corp

How to load a motorcycle on a truck

We had lots of fun with this video, and it will put you a smile on your face as well. You don’t want to find yourself in a situation like this though, so enjoy the video first to get something out of it, and then keep reading with our article, and watch the tip video we made, and read the little article below:

So here is how Pro’s doing it in a minute- without any damage and injuries. Let’s have a look on the equipment base you need to have to get the job all by yourself done.

  • Pickup truck with at least space for one motorcycle in width and length, and at least for hooks to tie-down
  • Long (reduces the ankle to the truck bed) fold-able bike ramp, which is very wide (walking path) as well
  • One short tie-down to secure the ramp down to the truck
  • Universal Roll-On Stand for single operation
  • At least two heavy-duty buckle zip (ratchets were yesterday!) tie-downs with swivel hooks
  • At least one rubber tie to transport and secure the bike ramp on the truck

From here we let Headcoach Can Akkaya from Superbike-Coach take over to explain the process:

Read the process in detail here: https://www.superbike-coach.com/coachs-blog/coachs-motorcycle-support