How to reduce rotating masses: Part 4

The one sided swing arm of the Panigale hosts the rear brake rotor and the sprocket carrier (which gets its own post later). I’ve replaced the rotor with a way lighter one and the brake pads to Bikemaster sinter metal pads. This stuff is affordable and never lets you down. At that point I’ve checked on the wheel alignment to see if the swing arm is bend. That went well so I can move on to center the two sprockets for a flawless chain run (next update)

Headcoach Can Akkaya

How to adjust the ride height on a Ducati: Part 3

Ducati Update 3

Some stuff around the swing arm and rear sets has been done. A carbon cover for the looks (the tire huger goes soon), and the toe protector makes truly sense. Rear shock pos changed to ‘flat’, and preload adjusted (gotta get familiar with the electronic setting system though). The rear sets journey was interesting. The challenge… to keep the expensive, but hell of smooth Ducati ‘PULL’ quickshifter- BUT use it in a MotoGP shift pattern system. Funny is, that Ducati offers a 4 page long description to just turn this around on the stock rear sets- but doesn’t even mention that a ‘PUSH’ quickshifter would be necessary. Thats about 300 bux extra, and I go… no. So I went to see if there are rear sets which allowing all kinds of constellations in the leverage to keep the pull shifter. I found a nite set in China for 120 bux incl shipping and they work smooth as hell. The pegs are quite short though, so i had to find washers which allow me to adjust their length a bit. What I extremely like with these rear sets is that they are fully adjustable since the stock sets are way to far in the back and making tired real quick. Those going all in the front and up… as I was use to on my prototype race bikes :-)

Headcoach Can Akkaya

How to build your own fender eliminator: part 2

Ducati Update 2

Unfortunately it needs a license plate to run this bike on some public roads, cuz’ I’ll use it to teach Road Skill 1on1 students. So, since the ugly and way to heavy holder is out… I’ve build my own fender eliminator with a few simple things: The license plate, a piece of Lowes aluminum sheet, and a plate light from BikeMaster Products. The cost… about 10 bux!!!

Headcoach Can Akkaya

What Racing Taught Me

Latest article about Can Akkaya: http://www.asphaltanddirt.com/2017/04/06/what-racing-motogp-taught-can-akayya/

Written by book author Aaron Heinrich, Asphalt & Dirt: Life on Two Wheels

 

 

How to find Sponsors to Support your Racing Career

This question hits racers, teams, managers and event organizers every year. Stuff like this is off topic for the public of course, so this article is not addressed to you- but maybe interesting enough to get an idea what’s going on in motorcycle racing for example.

When you start amateur racing, then there is a bunch of stuff going on in your head, also this… dreams, hope, wish-thinking. Yea, I know, I was there too so give me a break. So what’s happening from September till March is that thousands and thousands of athletes worldwide are looking naively for monetary support by RedBull with a 10 years contract… literally.  So here is what I’ve learned as I walked from the slowest amateur racer to a professional racer who almost made it to MotoGP.

Yea, I can hear voices saying again: ‘that was long time ago’, but believe me… nothing has been changed much. Well we have the internet and social media and blogs now too, and it seems that this should help to get to potential sponsors- whil I actually believe it makes it harder FOR the sponsor to pick the right horse since everyone tuned to a keyboard jockey and blows up Youtube with gazillions of gigabytes of more or less senseless 20 minutes track sessions. Am I sound mean? No, I just try to open your mind for whats wrong and whats right, so stick with me and let me show you first where all the wish-thinking like this brought us…

There is that couple who of course believe that their son is the next Marc Marquez. That’s totally fine of course, but blaming the entire industry for making all those mistakes in regard ‘our future talents’ is not quite correct. A promising lap on some go kart seems to deliver enough arguments for getting a Monster Energy contract, but this demanding attitude produces two psychological dead end roads…

  1. amateur racers getting the idea that racing without sponsors is not going anywhere and give up
  2. potential talents are not even start to race without having sponsors

I received a call from a Mom, asking me to support their kid by paying their racing fuel. After I told her that I competed against 120 racers to even qualify for an amateur race, and that I didn’t had money for racing fuel either… and that I also had to use slick tires in rain, and also that I kicked ass anyway, and that exactly that’s why I got my first check from a sponsor… she hung up on me. What’s that called… to much reality check?!

It takes many years of sweat and blood to make people believe in a racer. There is a relationship growing which builds something very important… a shield of loyalty, which kicks in when your results are not good sometimes.